Cancer Research

Sophia Bridgers



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Texas might become one of the worldwide leaders in cancer research after news of a 10 billion dollar investment driven by The University of Texas.

This money could allow researchers to be able to find the "cure" for cancer. Scientists are hoping that the money will attract top scientists around the world to con verge and strengthen the fight against cancer. However, some scientists are worried about under-the-table deals and quesiton where exactly the money will go.

Since the announcement in 2006, UT has given 216 million of the money it has raised to 1 55 programs of the 1,100 that proposed.

Not all of the money raised will go to research; some of it will go to scholarships, facilities, and faculty endowments.

As of September 2010, The University of Texas has raised 1.2 billion dollars. The campaign is supposed to end August 31st, 2014.




So where does my money go after donating it?

The program that you donated the money to generally gives all the money to a single institute or hospital. For example, all of the proceeds from the Ride to Conquer Cancer and the Weekend to End Breast Cancer go solely to Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto. That money than goes to improving medical equipment and maintenance of said equipent.

It can easily be said that all researchers need funding to conduct their work. Even though results come from a single source, the research is then used everywhere. For example, if So-And-So University finds a string of bacteria to fight breast cancer, everyone now has that knowledge and benefits from their research.



Race for the Cure, one of the many fundraising events listed on our site.
Race for the Cure, one of the many fundraising events listed on our site.











Citations:


"Stem cell opposition could steer research away from Texas." The Austin
American-Statesman 26 Jan. 2007: n. pag. Global Issues in Context. Web.
1 Nov. 2010. <http://find.galegroup.com/gic/
infomark.do?&contentSet=IAC-Documents&idigest=310f77125e75d0001c8828f77f253434&ty
pe=retrieve&tabID=T002&prodId=GIC&docId=CJ158439211&source=gale&userGroupName=new
11178&version=1.0>.


"Stem cell opposition could steer research away from Texas." The Austin
American-Statesman 26 Jan. 2007: n. pag. Global Issues in Context. Web.
1 Nov. 2010. <http://find.galegroup.com/gic/
infomark.do?&contentSet=IAC-Documents&idigest=310f77125e75d0001c8828f77f253434&ty
pe=retrieve&tabID=T002&prodId=GIC&docId=CJ158439211&source=gale&userGroupName=new
11178&version=1.0>.

Associated Press. "Texas Begins $3 Billion Quest to Cure Cancer." MSNBC. MSNBC
Interactive News LLC, 2 Oct. 2009. Web. 1 Nov. 2010.
<http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/33143096/>.

Hinkle, Josh. "TX Funds 155 Cancer Research Projects." Austin News. NBC, 9 Sept.
2010. Web. 1 Nov. 2010. <http://www.kxan.com/dpp/news/local/
tx-funds-155-cancer-research-projects>.

Ludwig, Melissa. "Texas Tech Hopes to Raise 1 Billion." My San Antonio. Hearst
Newspapers, 18 Oct. 2010. Web. 1 Nov. 2010. <http://www.mysanantonio.com/
news/education/texas_tech_hopes_to_raise_1_billion_103190534.html>.